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Institutions of Transboundary Water Governance

  • Gábor BaranyaiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Water Governance - Concepts, Methods, and Practice book series (WGCMP)

Abstract

Formal institutions play a key role in maintaining and strengthening cooperation over shared river basins. They provide a forum for policy-development, rule-making and dispute resolution. Such institutions are most commonly established at basin and bilateral level with a particular geographical focus. The global questions of transboundary water governance are, however, remain largely unattended due to the lack of a robust water-specific international institutional framework under the auspices of the United Nations.

Keywords

Institutions River basin organisations United Nations 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Water ScienceUniversity of Public ServiceBudapestHungary

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