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Adaptive Capacity of EU Transboundary Water Governance: The Dynamic Dimension of Resilience

  • Gábor BaranyaiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Water Governance - Concepts, Methods, and Practice book series (WGCMP)

Abstract

The system of transboundary water governance within the European Union displays a number of important vulnerabilities, such as the almost complete lack of water quantity management and allocation considerations, limited tools for the management of hydrological variability and restricted access to adequate dispute resolution mechanisms. The likelihood of conflict would, however, be significantly reduced or even eliminated, if the existing governance regime could be flexibly adjusted to emerging hydrological and political pressures. The adaptive capacity of EU transboundary water governance is assessed through a number of established resilience indicators such as coordination among the different levels and actors, transfer of information and feedback, and the authority and flexibility in decision-making and problem-solving. Such analysis shows that existing hydropolitical vulnerabilities are likely to persist as the rigid EU legal framework, coupled with a number of political and cultural obstacles, does not allow the dynamic adaptation of EU water policy objectives and measures to changes in basin hydrology and co-riparian politics.

Keywords

Adaptive capacity Resilience Hydropolitical vulnerability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Water ScienceUniversity of Public ServiceBudapestHungary

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