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Institutional Initiatives to Foster Green Finance at EU Level

  • Vladimiro MariniEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Impact Finance book series (SIF)

Abstract

The Paris Agreement and the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda evidenced the environmental risk implications of modern economies and consequently defined concrete global climate targets. Since then, the European Union has been adjusting its policy accordingly. In this respect, the aim of this chapter is twofold. First, it describes the main initiatives launched to increasingly reorient the European financial system towards sustainable investing. Second, it depicts the role of the European institutions in the global cooperation for a more sustainable development.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Rome Tor VergataRomeItaly

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