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Deforestation and Frequency of Floods in Romania

  • Daniel Peptenatu
  • Alexandra Grecu
  • Adrian Gabriel Simion
  • Karina Andreea Gruia
  • Ion Andronache
  • Cristian Constantin Draghici
  • Daniel Constantin DiaconuEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Water book series (SPWA)

Abstract

The extent of forest cuts is one of the greatest challenges of contemporary society, principally through the effects on ecosystems, air quality, hydrological regime and society. Changes in water leakage regime from the slopes are immediate responses of the ecosystem to short time cutting of forests from large areas. In this study, an assessment was made of deforested surfaces in the period 2000–2016, as well as the frequency of floods at the level of each administrative unit from Romania for the same time. Detailed analyzes focused on the main mountain groups and on a Danube meadow sector where the extent of deforestation is very great. The results highlight the obvious influence of forest cuts on large areas on the frequency of floods.

Keywords

Deforestation Hydrological regime Floods Mountain Assessment Frequency Ecosystem 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Research Center for Integrated Analysis and Territorial Management.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Peptenatu
    • 1
  • Alexandra Grecu
    • 1
  • Adrian Gabriel Simion
    • 1
  • Karina Andreea Gruia
    • 1
  • Ion Andronache
    • 1
  • Cristian Constantin Draghici
    • 1
  • Daniel Constantin Diaconu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Faculty of GeographyResearch Center for Integrated Analysis and Territorial Management, University of BucharestBucharestRomania

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