Advertisement

The Dance of Life

  • Judith Mc LeanEmail author
  • Sally Chance
Chapter
Part of the Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education book series (LAAE, volume 27)

Abstract

The chapter focuses on the particulars of a partnership amongst artists, an academic, audiences i.e. babies and family carers, and a performing arts centre’s staff, namely the commissioning Festival Director, offering a deep dive into the complexities of education and the performing arts. It introduces the concept of Dance Play, an original term coined by choreographer and dancer Sally Chance (Adelaide, Australia), describing a hybrid art form that encompasses the genres of dance, theatre, intentional play, song and music to create particular aesthetic, social, physical and emotional vocabularies for a specific audience – babies. Chance, in conversation with Professor Judith McLean (Brisbane, Australia), explores: the origins of dance play, its practical manifestation through a commissioned performance work for an early childhood festival Out of the Box (QPAC) entitled Nursery (2014, 2015), and the concomitant early developmental theories underpinning the form.

Throughout the chapter there is a polyphony of voices from the two worlds of education and theatre that together explore exciting developments happening in the nascent areas of performance for babies and early childhood. Dance play interrogates the nexus between audience as passive recipient and audience as active and discerning participant in support of Alison Gopnik’s claim that “babies and young children are like the R & D division of the human species” (Gopnik et al., The scientist in the crib: what early learning tells us. Harper Collins, New York, p vii, 2000). This chapter looks into the petri dish as a contribution to raising the criticality of arts based experiences for human development at the most formative period of development, early childhood.

Keywords

Teaching artist Dance play Aesthetic experience Babies Performance Matching Circle of security Holding space Brain based theory 

References

  1. Abbs, P. (Ed.). (1987). Living powers: The arts in education. London: Falmer.Google Scholar
  2. Abbs, P. (1989a). A is for aesthetic. London: Falmer.Google Scholar
  3. Abbs, P. (Ed.). (1989b). The symbolic order: A contemporary reader on the arts debate. London: Falmer.Google Scholar
  4. Banks, A. (2015). Four ways to click: Rewire your brain for stronger, more rewarding relationships. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar
  5. Bollas, C. (2007). The Freudian moment. London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  6. Booth, E. (2009). The music teaching artist’s bible. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Brennan, M. (2012, May 10). This [baby] life. The Herald Scotland.Google Scholar
  8. Bruner, J. (1986). Actual minds, possible worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Chance, S. (2009). An elaborate dance. Lowdown, 31(5), 8.Google Scholar
  10. Circle of security international. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://circleofsecurity.net/stipulations/. Accessed 8 Feb 2016.
  11. Cozolino, L. (2002). The neuroscience of human relationships. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  12. Cozolino, L. (2006). The neuroscience of psychotherapy: Building and rebuilding the human brain. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  13. Dewey, J. (1934). Arts as experience. New York: Capricorn Books.Google Scholar
  14. Eco, U. (1979). The role of the reader: Exploration in the semiotics of text. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Epstein, M. (2007). Psychotherapy without the self. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Gerhardt, S. (2004). Why love matters. Hove: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Giles, S. (2015). The kids are alright. Retrieved from http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/arts-in-daily-life/artist-stories/the-kids-are-alright/. Accessed 8 June 2016.
  18. Goldman, J., & Sims, A. W. (2015). Sound healing for beginners. Minnesota: Llewellyn Publisher.Google Scholar
  19. Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A. N., & Kuhl, K. L. (2000). The scientist in the crib: What early learning tells us. New York: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
  20. Insite Arts. (2015). This baby life by Sally Chance [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57qyLgmU1K8. Accessed 8 Feb 2016.
  21. Insite Arts. (n.d.). Nursery by Sally Chance [Video file]. Retrieved from http://insitearts.com.au/nursery/. Accessed 8 Feb 2016.
  22. Karen, R. (1994). Becoming attached. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Karen, R. (1998). Becoming attached. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Kristeva, J. (1995). New maladies of the soul. New York: Colombia University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Lewis, T., Amini, F., & Lannon, R. (2000). A general theory of love. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
  26. McLean, J. (2015). Lines of Flight. Griifith University PH.D Thesis.Google Scholar
  27. Queensland Performing Arts Centre. (2014). Out of the box festival. Brisbane.Google Scholar
  28. Scalia, J. (2002). Introduction. In J. Scalia (Ed.), The vitality of objects: Exploring the work of Christopher Bollas. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
  29. Schore, A. N. (2012). The science of the art of psychology. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  30. Siegel, D. (1999). The developing mind: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  31. Siegel, D., & Hartzell, M. (2004). Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-understanding can help you raise children who thrive. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  32. Stern, D. (1990). The diary of a baby. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  33. Stern, D. N. (2002). The first relationship: Infant and mother. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Stern, D. (2004). The present moment: In psychotherapy and everyday life. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  35. Tronick, E. (2007). The neurobehavioral and social-emotional development of infants and children. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  36. Urszula, D. (2012, October 18). Theatre for babies: What’s the point. Artshub. Retrieved from http://www.artshub.com.au/news-article/features/all-arts/urszula-dawkins/theatre-for-babies-whats-the-point-192284
  37. Winnicott, D. W. (1971). Playing and reality. London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  38. Winnicott, D. W. (1986). Home is where we start from. London: Penguin.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Creative Industries FacultyQueensland Performing Arts Centre and Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Queensland Performing Arts Centre and Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

Personalised recommendations