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Space Technology Drivers of Change

  • Scott Madry
Chapter
Part of the Space and Society book series (SPSO)

Abstract

This chapter will analyze the most important emerging, new, and disruptive technologies that have already, or shortly will, make an impact in the arena of space, as well as here on Earth. Major innovations such as artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and GNSS are included, along with less known and less understood emerging concepts such as edge computing and cubesats.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Madry
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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