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The Future of African Unification: Vision and Path

  • Thierno ThiamEmail author
  • Gilbert Rochon
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter draws on the arguments made in previous chapters in order to explore the realistic political, economic, social, and institutional potentialities for Africa’s continental unification aspirations as well as both the justification and pragmatic feasibility of such unification embracing Africans in the Diaspora. Specifically, this chapter re-examines African history in order to establish the historical antecedents and future prospects for African unity and achievements.  Alternative paths forward are evaluated that highlight positive developments across Africa and emphasize the need for Africa to design a new social contract based on a continental constitutional framework, which would include a federal government and a federal economic system.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tuskegee UniversityTuskegeeUSA
  2. 2.Tulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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