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Turn Design as Longitudinal Achievement: Learning on the Shop Floor

  • Hanh thi NguyenEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Educational Linguistics book series (EDUL, volume 38)

Abstract

This chapter examines the development of interactional competence by a novice hotel staff member during interactions with guests in which she used English as a second language. Specifically, conversation analysis of longitudinal data focuses on the novice’s changes in turn design in assessments, topic initiations, and topic pursuits. The analysis suggests that over time, she diversified the linguistic resources to achieve assessments, with some of these resources appearing to have been recruited from the guests’ assessment turns in early interactions. She also modified the formats of topic-initiation and topic-pursuit turns after earlier formulations became the trouble source in repair sequences. By examining a novice’s changes in turn design practices, this study identifies the trajectories and impetuses of language learning in the wild. As such, the findings reveal a developmental dimension to the shop floor problem (Garfinkel, Ethnomethodology’s programs: working out Durkheim’s aphorism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, New York, 2002).

Keywords

Interactional competence Longitudinal Conversation analysis Ethnomethodology Workplace Lingua franca EFL Small talk Hotel Vietnam 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hawaii Pacific UniversityHonoluluUSA

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