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European Biotech Entrepreneur Profile: Case Studies

  • Florentina MateiEmail author
  • Flavia Anghel
  • Mioara Varga
  • Mihaela Draghici
  • Cristina Coculescu
  • Oscar Vicente
Chapter

Abstract

To be entrepreneur it takes a certain type of personality, but there is also a range of skills needed for success. The authors have conducted a survey among European biotech entrepreneurs, trying to profile their skills, knowledge, and competencies adapted to different socioeconomical contexts; an analysis of potential differences between the Western and Eastern Europe sides has also been targeted. A high similarity in answers has been generally noticed, in relation to respondents’ competences levels, as well as on the importance of common competences/skills/abilities for being an entrepreneur, like creativity and innovation, professionalism, communication, leadership, and teamwork. An important conclusion is that in biotech companies there is a high demand for higher education graduates and these graduates have to continuously improve their technical and managerial knowledge and skills following training courses. The societal and economic context in the targeted countries has different influence on biotech new ventures. Several European biotech entrepreneurs have provided testimonials on their own experience and useful recommendations for future graduates.

Keywords

Europe Biotechnology Entrepreneurship Challenges Testimonials 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florentina Matei
    • 1
    Email author
  • Flavia Anghel
    • 2
  • Mioara Varga
    • 1
  • Mihaela Draghici
    • 1
  • Cristina Coculescu
    • 2
  • Oscar Vicente
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of BiotechnologiesUniversity of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of BucharestBucharestRomania
  2. 2.Romanian-American UniversityBucureștiRomania
  3. 3.Institute for Plant Molecular and Cell Biology (IBMCP, UPV-CSIC)Universitat Politècnica de ValènciaValenciaSpain

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