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The Conservative-Led Administrations from 2010: Familiar Policies in New Rhetoric

  • Jamie HardingEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The return to Conservative-led governments from 2010 was marked by traditional themes of cuts to public spending and assumptions that individual failings were the causes of social problems. Increases in all measures of homelessness were widely believed to be linked to cuts to social security for people of working age, although such a link was difficult to prove. Little interest was expressed by the government in the response of local authorities to statutory homelessness in the wake of large cuts to their funding, despite concern from several quarters about the cost and quality of temporary accommodation, especially in London. However, the 2017 Homelessness Reduction Act, largely based on the 2014 Housing Wales Act, represented a further move towards the secondary prevention of homelessness.

Keywords

Social justice Welfare reform Rough sleeping Localism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northumbria UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK

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