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General Background for Plant-Plant Allelopathic Interactions

  • Udo Blum
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes sources, sinks, turnover rates, modifying elements and identity, mobility, distribution, states and effects of potential allelopathic compounds.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Udo Blum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant & Microbial BiologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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