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Study of Dependence of Kinematic Viscosity and Thermal-Oxidative Stability of Motor Oils

  • V. G. ShramEmail author
  • Yu. N. Bezborodov
  • A. V. Lysyannikov
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering book series (LNME)

Abstract

The results of the study of thermo-oxidative stability of mineral and synthetic motor oils in the temperature range from 170 to 200 ℃ are presented. The indicators of thermo-oxidative resistance are proposed, taking into account optical density, evaporation, and kinematic viscosity. It should be noted that, as an indicator of thermo-oxidative resistance, three variants of a combination of optical density, evaporation coefficients, and relative viscosity were considered. The effect of temperature on the oxidation processes was investigated, and an analytical relationship between optical density, evaporation, and kinematic viscosity was obtained. It is established that the oxidation of mineral oil produces two types of products regardless of the oxidation temperature, which is confirmed by the presence of a branch of dependence with a high rate of change in optical density. It has been established that the change in kinematic viscosity during the oxidation of mineral and synthetic oils occurs according to a general U-shape, regardless of temperature.

Keywords

Temperature control Optical density Volatility Kinematic viscosity Thermal and oxidation resistance 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. G. Shram
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yu. N. Bezborodov
    • 1
  • A. V. Lysyannikov
    • 1
  1. 1.Siberian Federal UniversityKrasnoyarskRussia

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