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Civil Society and Its Role Within UNSCR 1325 National Action Plans

  • Andrea Jonjić-Beitter
  • Hanna Stadler
  • Flora Tietgen
Chapter

Abstract

Jonjić-Beitter, Stadler and Tietgen trace the role that states assign to civil society with regard to the genesis, implementation as well as the monitoring and evaluation of their respective UNSCR 1325 National Action Plans (NAPs). Following ten clearly defined indicators, they analyse 96 NAPs from 64 countries and shed light on the manifold ways civil society is included in the documents—in a specific, nonspecific or highly specific manner. The descriptive analysis raises questions about the importance of civil society to be included in NAPs in order to fully implement UNSCR 1325 and the WPS agenda and lays the ground for further research aimed at giving recommendations for the development of inclusive NAPs that synchronise state and civil society efforts.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Jonjić-Beitter
    • 1
  • Hanna Stadler
    • 2
  • Flora Tietgen
    • 3
  1. 1.BerlinGermany
  2. 2.MunichGermany
  3. 3.ReykjavíkIceland

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