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Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Infections

  • Ana Paula VelezEmail author
  • John N. Greene
  • Jorge Lamarche
Chapter

Abstract

Gastrointestinal infections in neutropenic patients are common especially in the setting of mucotoxic chemotherapy. In this setting common enteric pathogens can easily gain access to the bloodstream and cause bacteremia and severe sepsis. Additionally, other gastrointestinal infections commonly seen in immunocompetent patients such as clostridium difficile colitis can often complicate the clinical picture in neutropenic patients given the broad use of antibiotics.

Genitourinary infections in neutropenic patients occur as a complication of indwelling foley catheters, mucosal inflammation and anatomical abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Although the pathogenesis is similar to the immunocompetent population, the infections are more frequent and severe in neutropenic patients.

In this chapter, we will discuss the most common type of gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections in neutropenic patients.

Keywords

Candida esophagitis HSV esophagitis CMV esophagitis Neutropenic colitis Typhlitis Clostridium difficile colitis Proctitis Diverticulitis Hepatitis B and C virus Hemorrhagic viral cystitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Paula Velez
    • 1
    Email author
  • John N. Greene
    • 2
  • Jorge Lamarche
    • 3
  1. 1.University of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.USF Morsani College of Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research InstituteTampaUSA
  3. 3.USF Morsani College of Medicine, James Haley VA HospitalTampaUSA

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