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Conceptualizing University Internationalization

  • Catherine Yuan Gao
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Global Higher Education book series (PSGHE)

Abstract

By contextualizing university internationalization within other forces that are shaping the higher education landscape, such as globalization, regionalization, and New Public Management, this chapter provides a critical analysis of internationalization’s definitions, ideologies, motives, and institutional strategies that emphasize the complexities, controversies, and gaps in conceptualizing university internationalization. Although internationalization has become one of the topics in higher education discussed most, there is no well-established conceptual framework of the phenomenon. By using the extensive previous works on this phenomenon, generic components of institutional international strategies were identified that indicated the structural and philosophical similarities between institutions and allowed meaningful comparisons to be made between universities’ internationalization efforts.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Yuan Gao
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for International Research on EducationVictoria UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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