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Ombud Technique as Demosprudential

  • Margaret DoyleEmail author
  • Nick O’Brien
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter begins the task of applying the insights drawn from the broader design culture to the reimagining of administrative justice as a means of delivering social rights in the small places of daily life. It does so by concentrating on the ombud institution as the template for administrative justice more generally and by identifying four central aspects of ombud technique: investigation; interpretation; iteration; and institutional focus. In this way, the ombud emerges as ‘flaneur’, ‘story-teller’, ‘bricoleur’ and ‘bridge-builder’, with a distinctive capacity to give expression to the central demosprudential values of community, network and openness. At the same time the ombud is presented as a demosprudential model for other parts of the reimagined administrative justice fabric.

Keywords

Ombud Technique Demosprudence Investigation Interpretation Iteration Institutional focus 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of EssexLondonUK
  2. 2.University of LiverpoolStockportUK

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