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Tense and Aspect in L3 Interlanguage. The Effect of Lexical Aspect and Discourse Grounding on the Development of Tense and Aspect Marking in L3 Italian

  • Zuzana TothEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 35)

Abstract

This study presents the results of analyses carried out on written narratives (N = 103), collected from university learners of L3 Italian, designed to examine the effect of lexical aspect and discourse grounding on past tense marking in L3 Italian. The analyses reveal that, contrary to the predictions of the Lexical Aspect Hypothesis and the Discourse Hypothesis, these two factors do not reach their highest degree of influence during early stages of language acquisition. The interlanguage of low proficiency learners does not show the effects of lexical aspect or discourse grounding. On the contrary, the effect of both lexical aspect and discourse grounding increases with higher proficiency.

Keywords

Lexical aspect Morphological aspect Aspect hypothesis Discourse hypothesis Aspect marking Interlanguage 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Romance Languages and LiteraturesComenius University in BratislavaBratislavaSlovakia

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