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Processes of State Creation and Democratization in Peru, Chile, and Argentina

  • Alex Roberto HybelEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The colonizations of Peru, Chile, and Argentina were initiated during the first half of the 1500s. The transformations they experienced during the colonial period and after they attained independence differed substantially. Chile was the most effective one at creating a legitimate state and a relatively stable democracy, followed by Argentina and then Peru. Their disparities prompt these questions: Why were Peru’s leaders less effective at creating the state and eventually establishing a democratic regime than Argentina’s, and in turn, why were Peru’s and Argentina’s leaders less effective than Chile’s? This chapter discusses the histories of Peru’s, Chile’s, and Argentina’s state-creation and political regime–formation processes separately, beginning with the colonial period.

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marina del ReyUSA

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