Advertisement

Theories of State Creation and Democratization

  • Alex Roberto HybelEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This study is built on the argument that to understand why some states in the Americas have been more effective at creating democratic regimes than others, it is imperative to focus on the evolution of their respective states and political regimes, identify the factors that either aided or obstructed the processes at different points in time, and isolate potential causal relationships. Before conducting such analyses, however, it is necessary to focus on the nature of the state and of democratic regimes. This chapter’s first section discusses and evaluates alternative definitions of the state and theories of state creation. The second section examines and assesses different conceptualizations of democracy and theories of democratization.

Bibliography

  1. Almond, Gabriel A., and G. Bingham Powell. 1966. Comparative Politics: A Developmental Approach. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. Print.Google Scholar
  2. Barker, Ernest. 1942. Reflections on Government. London: Oxford University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  3. Bosold, David, and Christian Achrainer. 2012. Democratization and Security in Central and Eastern Europe and the Post-Soviet States. In Democratization and Security in Central and Eastern Europe and the Post-Soviet States, 9–22. Baden-Baden, Germany: Nomos. Web. 24 Jan. 2019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bull, Hedley. 1977. The Anarchical Society. New York: Colombia University Press. Print.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Daalder, Hans. 2011. State Formation, Parties, and Democracy: Studies in Comparative European Politics. Colchester: ECPR Press. Print.Google Scholar
  6. Dahl, Robert A. 1971. Polyarchy: Participation and Opposition. New Haven: Yale University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  7. ———. 1974. Regimes and Oppositions. New Haven: Yale University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  8. ———. 1982. Dilemmas of Pluralist Democracy: Autonomy Vs. Control. New Haven: Yale University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  9. ———. 1989. Democracy and Its Critics. Yale University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  10. Demissie, Meaza Zerihun. 2014. The Natural Resource Curse in Sub-Saharan Africa: Transparency and International Initiatives. Hattiesburg: University of Southern Mississippi. Print.Google Scholar
  11. Di John, Jonathan. 2010. The ‘Resource Curse’: Theory and Evidence. Real Instituto Elcano. Web. 03 Jul. 2017.Google Scholar
  12. Diamond, Larry J., ed. 1993. Political Culture and Democracy in Developing Countries: Conference: Papers. Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Print.Google Scholar
  13. ———. 1999. Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  14. Diamond, Larry Jay, Jonathan Hartlyn, and Juan J. Linz. 1999. Introduction: Politics, Society, and Democracy in Latin America. In Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, ed. Larry Diamond, Jonathan Hartlyn, Juan J. Linz, and Seymour Martin Lipset, 2nd ed. Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Print.Google Scholar
  15. Dominguez, Jorge I. 1987. Political Change: Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. In Understanding Political Development, ed. Myron Weiner and Samuel P. Huntington. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. Print.Google Scholar
  16. El Medini, Bakry M. 2013. Civil Society and Democratic Transformation in Contemporary Egypt: Premise and Promises. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 3 (2). Web. 24 Jan. 2019.Google Scholar
  17. Harbeson, John W. 1994. Civil Society and Political Renaissance in Africa. In Civil Society and the State in Africa, ed. John W. Harbeson et al. Boulder: Lynne Rienner. Print.Google Scholar
  18. Haynes, Jeff. 2004. Democracy in the Developing World: Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Cambridge: Polity. Print.Google Scholar
  19. Herbst, Jeffrey. 2000. States and Power in Africa. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  20. Huntington, Samuel. 1966. Political Modernization: America vs. Europe. World Politics 18 (03). Web. 24 Jan. 2019.Google Scholar
  21. Jessop, Bob. 2015. The State: Past, Present, Future. New York: Wiley. Print.Google Scholar
  22. Karl, Terry Lynn. 1990. Dilemmas of Democratization in Latin America. Comparative Politics 23 (1). Web. 24 Jan. 2019.Google Scholar
  23. ———. 1997. The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States. Berkeley: University of California Press. Print.Google Scholar
  24. Katzenstein, Peter. 1978. Conclusion: Domestic Structures and Strategies of Foreign Economic Policy. In Between Power and Plenty, ed. Peter Katzenstein. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. Print.Google Scholar
  25. Krasner, Stephen. 1978. Defending the National Interest. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  26. Linz, Juan J., and Alfred C. Stepan. 1997. Toward Consolidated Democracies. Journal of Democracy 7 (2). Web. 24 Jan. 2019.Google Scholar
  27. López-Alves, Fernando. 2000. State Formation and Democracy in Latin America, 1810–1900. Durham: Duke University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  28. Lowi, Theodore J. 1988. The Return to the State: Critiques. The American Political Science Review 82 (3). Print.Google Scholar
  29. McKinstry, Carolyn Maull. 2011. While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age During the Civil Rights Movement. Carol Stream: Tyndale House. Print.Google Scholar
  30. Merkel, Wolfgang. 2004. Embedded and Defective Democracies. Democratization 11 (5): 33–58. Web. 24 Jan. 2019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Merton, Robert K. 1973. The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Print.Google Scholar
  32. Mitchell, Timothy. 1992. Go Beyond the States Response. American Political Science Review 86 (4): 1007–1021. Web. 24 Jan. 2019.Google Scholar
  33. Møller, Jørgen, and Svend-Erik Skaaning. 2010. Post-Communist Regime Types: Hierarchies Across Attributes and Space. Communist and Post-Communist Studies 43 (1): 51–71. Web. 24 Jan. 2019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Nordlinger, Eric A. 1987. Taking the State Seriously. In Understanding Political Development, ed. Myron Weiner and Samuel P. Huntington. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. Print.Google Scholar
  35. O’Donnell, Guillermo. 2000. Democratic Theory and Comparative Politics. Studies in Comparative International Development, 36(4).Google Scholar
  36. Poggi, Gianfranco. 1990. The State: Its Nature, Development and Prospects. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  37. Powell, G. Bingham. 1982. Contemporary Democracies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  38. Przeworski, Adam, Michael E. Alvarez, José Antonio Chibub, and Fernando Limongi. 2001. What Makes Democracies Endure. In The Global Divergence of Democracies, ed. Larry Diamond and Marc F. Plattner. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  39. Rotberg, Robert I. 2003. Failed States, Collapsed States, Weak States: Causes and Indicators. In When States Fail: Causes and Consequences, ed. Robert I. Rotberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  40. Safford, Frank. 1987. Politics, Ideology, and Society. In The Cambridge History of Latin America. From Independence to C.1870, ed. Leslie Bethell, vol. 3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  41. ———. 2014. The Construction of National States in Latin America, 1820–1890. In State and Nation Making in Latin America and Spain: Republics of the Possible, ed. Miguel Angel Centeno and Agustin E. Ferraro. New York: Cambridge University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  42. Sartori, Giovanni. 1976. Parties and Party Systems: A Framework for Analysis. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  43. ———. 1987. The Theory of Democracy Revisited, Part One. Chatham: Chatham House Publishers. Print.Google Scholar
  44. Sassen, Saskia. 2006. Territory, Authority, Rights: From Medieval to Global Assemblages. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  45. Schumpeter, Joseph A. 1947. Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy. Harper & Brothers. Print.Google Scholar
  46. Skocpol, Theda. 1985. Bringing the State Back In: Strategies of Analysis in Current Research. In Bringing the State Back In, ed. Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Peter B. Evans, and Theda Skcopol. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  47. Skowronek, Stephen. 1982. Building a New American State. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Print.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Thies, Cameron G. 2005. War, Rivalry, and State Building in Latin America. American Journal of Political Science 49 (3): 451–465. Web. 24 Jan. 2019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Tilly, Charles. 1975. Reflections on the History of European State-Making. In The Formation of National States in Western Europe, ed. Charles Tilly. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Print.Google Scholar
  50. ———. 2000. The Formation of European States, AD 990–1990. In Sociological Worlds: Comparative and Historical Readings on Society, ed. Stephen K. Sanderson. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. Print.Google Scholar
  51. Valenzuela, Arturo. 1978. The Breakdown of Democratic Regimes: Chile. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1974. The Modern World-System. New York: Academic Press. Print.Google Scholar
  53. Wendt, Alexander, and R. Duvall. 1989. Institutions and International Order. In Global Changes and Theoretical Challenges: Approaches to World Politics in the 1990s, ed. Ernst-Otto Czempiel and James Rosenau. Lexington: Lexington Books. Print.Google Scholar
  54. Yee, Albert. 1993. State-Society Complexes and State Autonomy in Political Analysis. Unpublished Paper. Print.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marina del ReyUSA

Personalised recommendations