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Young People’s Rights to, in and Through Education

  • Helen Hanna
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Global Citizenship Education and Democracy book series (GCED)

Abstract

This chapter provides the legal-conceptual framework for the research, which is one of the education rights that derive from international human rights law and its official interpretations. The first half covers the main international laws and procedures that relate to education, including a focus on the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The second half considers the area of interpretation of international law and the challenges it poses when trying to assess whether citizenship education adheres to these laws. It proposes a 2-A framework for analysing citizenship education in Northern Ireland and Israel, where education should be ‘acceptable’ (meaning, for example, relevant, culturally appropriate, non-discriminatory and so on) and ‘adaptable’ (flexible to the needs of a changing society, particular groups and individual students).

Keywords

International human rights law Right to education Acceptable education Adaptable education 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Hanna
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of International and Comparative EducationEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina

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