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Performance Evaluation Process and Express Decision

  • Alexander YemelyanovEmail author
  • Alla Yemelyanov
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 953)

Abstract

The Performance Evaluation Process (PEP) is a structured technique specifically designed to support an individual with making personal and quick decisions in complex problems, in which the factors of uncertainty and risk are both present, and in which individual biases and emotional factors may be an important influence. PEP is based on a self-regulation model of a decision-making process developed within the systemic-structural activity theory. PEP regulates two concurrently running processes in decision-making – the formation of a mental model and the formation of the level of motivation by using two general regulators: the factor of significance and factor of difficulty. The factor of difficulty provides feedback control, while the factor of significance provides feedforward control. Formation of a mental model is provided dynamically by constructing a decision hierarchy. Formation of the level of motivation is provided recursively by using the IL-Frame. When evaluating outcomes, the IL-Frame operates with four general criteria of success. Express Decision (ED), a progressive mobile web application, is guided by PEP to provide decision-making support.

Keywords

Decision-making Emotions Quick decisions Systemic-structural activity theory Self-regulation Feedback and feedforward controls Performance Evaluation Process Decision support Progressive mobile web application 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceGeorgia Southwestern State UniversityAmericusUSA

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