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Promoting Soldier Cognitive Readiness for Battle Tank Operations Through Bio-signal Measurements

  • Jari LaarniEmail author
  • Satu Pakarinen
  • Mika Bordi
  • Kari Kallinen
  • Johanna Närväinen
  • Helena Kortelainen
  • Kristian Lukander
  • Kati Pettersson
  • Jaakko Havola
  • Kai Pihlainen
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 953)

Abstract

This paper will present the progress in developing a concept and a demonstrator system for the assessment of fatigue, acute stress and combat/cognitive readiness in military domain. A battle-tank crew’s acute stress is measured with electrocardiography recordings of heart rate/heart rate variability. Cognitive performance is measured with a battery of cognitive tests, and task performance is estimated by soldiers’ self-ratings, trainers’ evaluations and objective measures from simulator data. The project consists of several test sessions in which cognitive and physiological indices of stress are measured while military conscripts perform battle-tank exercises both in simulator and field settings. The effect of task difficulty, sleep deprivation and operator role on performance are investigated. Different versions of the demonstrator system are also evaluated. The project results will be primarily used for the development of a bio-signal monitoring system, evaluation of transfer of simulator training to real-life exercises and improvement of military aptitude testing.

Keywords

Cognitive readiness Psychophysiology Military Wearable system 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is funded by the Technology Program of the Finnish Defence Forces. We thank the Karelia Brigade, the military trainees and conscripts of the Brigade and members of the reference group for making this research possible.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jari Laarni
    • 1
    Email author
  • Satu Pakarinen
    • 2
  • Mika Bordi
    • 3
  • Kari Kallinen
    • 4
  • Johanna Närväinen
    • 1
  • Helena Kortelainen
    • 1
  • Kristian Lukander
    • 2
  • Kati Pettersson
    • 2
  • Jaakko Havola
    • 3
  • Kai Pihlainen
    • 5
  1. 1.VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd.EspooFinland
  2. 2.Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, TyöterveyslaitosHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.Savox Communications Ltd.EspooFinland
  4. 4.Finnish Defence Forces Technical Research CentreTuusulaFinland
  5. 5.Training Division of the Defence Command FinlandTuusulaFinland

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