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The Variability of U.S. Women’s Plus Size Product Sizing and Self-Identified Size 18 Bodies

  • Susan L. SokolowskiEmail author
  • Linsey Griffin
  • Jessie Silbert
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 968)

Abstract

In 2016, the apparel market value for plus sizes in the U.S., was estimated at 20.4 billion dollars. As there is a lack of accessible measurement and sizing standardization in the U.S. for this body type, retailers have developed their own unique systems. This pilot study will explore how a sample of 65 plus size women, through 3D body scans, fit into the top U.S. retailer’s measures and sizes. The retailers investigated, included: Walmart, Kohl’s, JC Penney, Target, Macy’s and Lane Bryant. The findings established that none of the retailers are meeting the needs of the plus size body. Future research must consider methods to improve access to measurements, apparel sizing and product development for this growing demographic.

Keywords

Plus size U.S. women Sizing systems Fit Apparel 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Body Labs (now Amazon) for their support in this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan L. Sokolowski
    • 1
    Email author
  • Linsey Griffin
    • 2
  • Jessie Silbert
    • 1
  1. 1.Sports Product DesignUniversity of OregonPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Design Housing and ApparelUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulUSA

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