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Disciplinary Dungeon Master

  • Marcelo M. Valença
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a perspective on teaching from the Global South—Brazil, to be more precise. It describes how I ended up becoming a professor. I relied on something that was familiar to me in order to feel comfortable in class and it soon became my most noticeable characteristic as a professor. Based on active learning methodologies, I use narratives and storytelling to structure my classes as Dungeons & Dragons campaigns. It helped students to connect theory and practice and to understand complex/abstract concepts as this strategy allows me to catch student’s attention and to provide context, relevance, and meaningful connections between what they are studying and their real lives.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcelo M. Valença
    • 1
  1. 1.Brazilian Naval War CollegeRio de JaneiroBrazil

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