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A Paper Boat

  • Zoe Charalambous
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture book series (PASCC)

Abstract

Charalambous returns to the initial question “Why do we write?” arguing that writing is a practice of detachment and connection. The effects of the six exercises are summarized along with the case studies of writing fantasies in the order of the chapters interlinked with a commentary narrative asking the reader to reflect upon their own writing. Justifying the rationale of the pedagogy of writing fantasy, Charalambous clarifies the contribution of the workbook in relation to Creative Writing studies: not privileging canonical readings of Creative Writing texts, analyzing students’ texts on a micro-level and generating qualitative data to inform the teaching of Creative Writing. She ends the book marking her vision of the pedagogy of writing fantasy as disrupting status quo conceptions of Creative Writing.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zoe Charalambous
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ResearcherPanoramaGreece

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