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Why Does Writing Matter?

  • Zoe Charalambous
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture book series (PASCC)

Abstract

Charalambous starts with the premise that we constantly make and remake our writer identity through writing and that what we forbid ourselves from in our writing practice may reveal much about our writer identity. She explains how her Creative Writing students’ experiences of writing Other than themselves initiated her interest in researching Creative Writing exercises. To construct the rationale of the workbook, a brief account of the historical emergence of Creative Writing as a discipline and of its current multifaceted perception in terms of its relationship to literature and other disciplines are provided. Finally, her research investigating the sequence of six Creative Writing exercises and the exploration of writing fantasy are connected to the structure and goals of this workbook.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zoe Charalambous
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ResearcherPanoramaGreece

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