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The Effects of Digital Literacy Support Tools on First Grade Students’ Comprehension of Informational e-Books

  • Heather Herman
  • Katia CiampaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Literacy Studies book series (LITS, volume 18)

Abstract

This mixed-methods study examined the patterns between 14 first graders’ use of digital literacy support tools (annotating connections, annotating I wonders, and looking back in the text) and comprehension scores when reading informational e-books. Quantitative data sources included e-book comprehension quiz scores and literacy support tools’ tally system. Two types of qualitative data were collected: teacher interviews and researcher’s anecdotal notes. A chi-square analysis indicated significant patterns between the e-book comprehension scores and the usage of the literacy support tools, X2(6, n = 211) = 25.79, p = 0.001. The qualitative data highlights the students’ digital literacy support tool preference, their ability to use the digital literacy support tools, and understanding the relevant application of the digital literacy support tools. This study is an initial attempt to shift teachers’ and researchers’ views of independent informational reading to include digital text, such as e-books to supplement the classroom library.

Keywords

Digital literacy Literacy support tools Informational e-Books Reading Comprehension Annotating 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.East Penn School DistrictMacungieUSA
  2. 2.School of Human Service Professions, Center for EducationWidener UniversityChesterUSA

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