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Moral Inhabitability and Work Environments

  • Edie West
Chapter

Abstract

In Great Britain, a 1948 Report issued by the Ministry of Health, the Department of Health for Scotland, the Ministry of Labour and National Service, on the recruitment and training of nurses to address yet another post-war nursing shortage, indicated that not much had changed for nurses except the steady increase in clinical skill and responsibility [1]. The report called for, amongst other things, the ‘humanizing’ of hospital discipline for nurses. It also included several comments from nurses who were interviewed by the committee at the time about their reasons for leaving the nursing profession before completing training. This statement made by one of them illustrates the type of work environment which still existed at the end of the 1940s.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edie West
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University of PennsylvaniaIndianaUSA

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