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Place and Claims: Cultural and Communication in Appalachia

  • Edie West
Chapter

Abstract

Breckinridge was a woman with a remarkable talent for being politic in all interests of concern to her organization. Her organization’s interests were also intimately entwined with the interests of the local community. This was something that was not true of other organizational cultures entering the region. She used a unique form of cultural diplomacy to maximize the needed support for the service, which relied heavily on outside financial support and volunteer Couriers to work with her nurses. She also used it to garner the support of the local population. Therefore, to her aristocratic contributors she proffered the notion that it was not in-breeding but rather, un-mixed breeding of good English stock (of which she knew perfectly well most of them were) that contributed to research findings that indicated justification for her Service [1]. She made her argument to other health professionals using scientifically sound research generated from mental tests given to Appalachian children by a psychologist who was an expert in this field of study to argue against the eugenics crowd of her day [2]. To the local populous she was a distant relation. A former 20-year employee of the FNS and long-time resident said:

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edie West
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University of PennsylvaniaIndianaUSA

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