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Rights and Claims: Culture and Communication in Appalachia

  • Edie West
Chapter

Abstract

The isolation created by the geographical location of Appalachian peoples has fostered self-reliance, dependence on family and kin, and distrust of outsiders often referred to as cooperative independence [1]. Because of the long history of isolation as well as outside exploitation of these peoples, they tend to be distrustful of outsiders and outside organizations [2]. Obtaining the trust of Appalachian people requires that one become a part of their culture, engaging in the community’s activities. Appalachian culture is person oriented rather than task oriented, and person’s identity is dependent on their community and kinship ties.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edie West
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University of PennsylvaniaIndianaUSA

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