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Anglo-America: The Case of Edward Shils, Sociologist, 1910–1995

  • Martin Bulmer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses a more general question about directions of academic influence via a case study of a particular Anglo-American sociologist, Edward A. Shils, whose career between 1940 and his death in 1995 was carried on in both the United States and the United Kingdom. He lived both in the USA and England at different times, and held academic appointments in both countries at the University of Chicago, the London School of Economics and Political Science and the University of Cambridge. This chapter considers his contributions to the history of the discipline, to comparative macrosociology, the study of primary groups and the importance of primordial and personal ties in social relations. Differences between sociology in each society are highlighted.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Bulmer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of SurreyGuildfordUK

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