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The Development Ideology of South Africa as a Rainbow Nation

  • Hangwelani Hope MagidimishaEmail author
  • Lovemore Chipungu
Chapter

Abstract

The birth of democracy in South Africa in 1994 also saw the rebirth of South Africa as a rainbow nation. In this regard, this chapter envisages the inclusive South Africa that was created to accommodate people from different backgrounds. In particular, improving access to services in the countryside especially in the former Bantustans where the majority of the indigenous people were housed. But of particular interest is the magnetic nature of this rainbow nation which also attracted people from across the borders largely driven by the “perceived” endless social and economic opportunities that it housed. The rainbow nation emerges as a nation battling to accommodate everyone especially the poor and the marginalised. Serious crakes are witnessed when xenophobia raises its ugly head as fierce competition for social and economic opportunities appear in the lower echelons of society. On the other hand, massive corruptive tendencies among those with access to power and resources negatively impact on service delivery as they fail to live to the expectations of their mandates. Thus the rainbow nation though inclusive as it may appear, has serious and unresolved conflicts waging which pose a serious challenge to the community and to its sustainability.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hangwelani Hope Magidimisha
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lovemore Chipungu
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Kwazulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa

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