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Conclusion

  • Olivier RozenbergEmail author
Chapter
Part of the French Politics, Society and Culture book series (FPSC)

Abstract

This chapter concludes by offering a synthesis on the roles considered throughout the books. Some roles have been poorly transformed (constituency members, ambitious MPs, specialized MPs). Other have taken a new dimension in the context of the critics of the European integration (defender of land and tradition, outsider high flyers). And others were created in reaction to the EU (sovereigntists, the ones who rub shoulders with the great and powerful, members of the EU club). To some extent, the diversity of those profiles illustrates the wealth of the parliamentary involvement in EU affairs. Yet, it should not hide the lack of continuous and genuine involvement of the vast majority of French MPs in EU affairs.

Keywords

French Parliament Roles European Union European integration Parliamentary involvement 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for European Studies and Comparative PoliticsSciences PoParisFrance

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