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Historical Context

  • Klas RönnbäckEmail author
  • Oskar Broberg
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe the historical context of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for our study. We delineate how European imperialism developed during the period, with a particular focus on the colonization of the African continent, the so-called Scramble for Africa. We also describe the development of global financial markets and the key role played by the City of London. The chapter finally introduces a discussion on the interconnection between these two aspects—international, and in particular British, investments in the African colonies.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Economy and SocietyUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden

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