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Conclusion: Putting the UNHCR’s EDP-Approach into Context

  • Sinja Hantscher
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Political Science book series (CPS)

Abstract

This chapter first presents the findings of the analysis. The following sections interpret the findings and discuss the implications of the thesis’ findings for security theory, for organizational research, for the research on human mobility and for IR theory. After a critical reflection on the research design and a presentation of the policy implications, the last sub-chapter elaborates on the way ahead for human mobility in general and environmentally displaced persons in particular.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sinja Hantscher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of History and Social SciencesInstitute of Political Science, TU DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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