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Theoretical Background: Organizational Theories and the Research on International Organizations

  • Sinja Hantscher
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Political Science book series (CPS)

Abstract

This chapter takes a theoretical stance and discusses approaches from organizational theory to address the research gap that exists on the topic of environmentally displaced persons (EDPs). In order to answer the research question of why the UNHCR approaches the topic of EDPs the way that it does, the analysis will be guided by a classification of organizational theory into internal and external factors.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Sinja Hantscher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of History and Social SciencesInstitute of Political Science, TU DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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