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Linguistic Landscaping in Tabriz, Iran: A Discursive Transformation of a Bilingual Space into a Monolingual Place

  • Seyed Hadi MirvahediEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This research examines linguistic landscape data collected in three main streets in Tabriz, Iran. The analysis demonstrates what types of discourses mediate, and are created by language choices on governmental and private signs. Farsi is normalized for both governmental and private signs reflecting and reproducing national ideologies. The absence of Azerbaijani as the native language of the people in the LL of Tabriz is noticeable. Overall, the findings suggest that the linguistic landscape is not always a fair representation of the linguistic repertoire of the people living in a geographical space, but rather language choice in the LL is deployed by the state and/or people to portray an image of a place they desire and aspire to.

Keywords

Semiotics Linguistic landscape Tabriz Iran Azerbaijani Minority languages 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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