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Silly Questions and Arguments for the Implicit, Cinematic Narrator

  • Angela Curran
Chapter

Abstract

How does movie narration work on the viewer so that she comprehends a story? This chapter concerns the controversy in the philosophy of film over the right answer to this question. The focus is on the view that there are ubiquitous, implicit narrators in fiction films. The debate between friends and foes of the cinematic narrator has been at a stalemate most centrally because there seems to be no resolution as to whether the questions critics raise about the implied narrator in movies are legitimate ones to ask. In this chapter, I aim to advance the debate by examining how what is known as the “absurd imaginings” problem arises for all the central arguments for the elusive cinematic narrator and to discuss why the questions critics pose about this narrator are legitimate ones to ask.

Keywords

Cinematic narration Implied narrator Absurd imaginings Fiction 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Curran
    • 1
  1. 1.Kansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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