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The Autobiographical Documentary

  • Laura T. Di Summa
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, I critically assess the ability of autobiographical documentary to convey an authentic portrayal of the self and analyze the cinematic means through which autobiographical documentaries may be able to do so. I compare and outline the chief differences between autobiographical documentaries and literary memoirs and assess the ways in which cognitive analysis of film and post-structuralist accounts within film theory and documentary studies have dealt with the distinction between fiction and nonfiction. I lastly consider new avenues of autobiographical expression such as the ones potentially offered by social media, blogs, video diaries, personal websites, and so on.

Keywords

Autobiography Memoir Narrative Fiction Nonfiction Authenticity Documentary modes Documentary Social media 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura T. Di Summa
    • 1
  1. 1.William Paterson UniversityWayneUSA

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