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Cognitive Theory of the Moving Image

  • Carl Plantinga
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of cognitive theory of the moving image, considering it as an approach rather than a methodology. It traces the history and institutional affiliations of cognitive theory, then focuses on the kinds of experiences the moving image media afford viewers, and the design elements that foster those experiences. It distinguishes between “cold” and “hot” cognition and discusses the sense in which cognitive theory can be said to be naturalistic. The chapter goes on to discuss narrative comprehension, cognition and embodiment, character engagement (together with sympathy and empathy), mood and emotion, and finishes with a discussion of new directions for cognitive theory. Along the way, the chapter also discusses objections to the approach.

Keywords

Cognitivism Filmic experience Embodiment Empathy Sympathy Embodiment 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Plantinga
    • 1
  1. 1.Calvin CollegeGrand RapidsUSA

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