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Film Art from the Analytic Perspective

  • Deborah Knight
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the emergence of a distinctively analytic approach to film as art. I begin with an overview of Berys Gaut’s claim that the philosophy of film art is, roughly speaking, organized around three levels of analysis: the film medium; film narrative and aesthetics; and philosophical themes that emerge in films. Next I trace the emergence of an analytic philosophy of film as art in the work of Alexander Sesonske and Francis Sparshott. Sesonske and Sparshott each draw attention to the central features of film aesthetics—notably to the ways in which film treats time and space. I conclude by discussing contemporary developments such as “film as philosophy.”

Keywords

Film medium Film-philosophy Film space Film time Character identification Spectator engagement Fictional worlds 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Knight
    • 1
  1. 1.Queen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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