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Imagination, Art, and Radical Possibility in Dewey

  • Vasco d’Agnese
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, d’Agnese focuses on three aspects of Deweyan thought, namely imagination, art, and radical possibility. Specifically, d’Agnese argues that a comprehension of how imagination, aesthetic experience, and possibility work is essential to the understanding of both the Deweyan oeuvre and of education. On the one hand, Dewey conceived of imagination as the starting point of several cherished issues—that is, inquiry, meaning creation, knowledge, conscious experience, and connectedness. On the other hand, while aesthetic experience and quality are essential for thinking to happen, radical possibility is both the end and starting point of the educational process as it is conceived by Dewey. The intertwined notions of growth and education will dissolve into emptiness if detached from the sense of possibility that might be realized; this is an idea that Dewey pursued throughout his entire oeuvre.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasco d’Agnese
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Campania Luigi VanvitelliCasertaItaly

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