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Preliminary Remarks

  • Katrin Fenrich
Chapter

Abstract

International law no longer turns a blind eye to the individual. Quite the contrary, “with increasing frequency international legal norms directly address and engage individuals” and confer rights and obligations upon them. Numerous international treaties, agreements and protocols have been dedicated to the legal position of human beings. Special Rapporteurs, Working Groups and treaty bodies have been established to observe compliance with international Human Rights standards and are consistently presenting suggestions to further advance the law. Criminal courts and tribunals have been installed to prosecute the misconduct of individuals and sanction the commission of international crimes.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrin Fenrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for International Law of Peace and Armed ConflictRuhr University BochumBochumGermany

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