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Socio-economic Regulation in Core Arab Economies: Institutional Contexts for Economic Reform

  • Maximilian Benner
Chapter
Part of the Economic Geography book series (ECOGEO)

Abstract

The chapter introduces theories dealing with socio-economic regulation and consolidates them into an integrated regulation framework. Further, the chapter focuses the framework on the context found in core Arab economies with their specific structural economic challenges.

Keywords

Regulation school National systems of innovation Varieties of capitalism Social systems of production Inclusive and extractive institutions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maximilian Benner
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ViennaViennaAustria

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