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Saor an tSeanbhean Bhocht!”: Moving from Cailleach to Spéirbhean

  • Christin M. MulliganEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Geocriticism and Spatial Literary Studies book series (GSLS)

Abstract

This chapter addresses Early Irish songs and tales that feature Ireland as a cailleach or hag transformed into a spéirbhean or sky-queen, imagery adapted into the anti-imperial vision-quest poetry of Jacobite aislingí. The translations of those verses during the Irish Revival by numerous writers, such as J. C. Mangan and P. H. Pearse followed by repeated satirizations of them in regard to the possible failures of transformative sovereign autonomy by Modernists James Joyce and Máirtín Ó Cadhain, as well as many contemporary poets, including Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon, and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, instantiate the interrelation of power, desire, and place in English and Irish and reveal the limits of female bodies as a tool of dissident discourses that often still deny real women sociopolitical autonomy as a result of lingering neo-imperialist, nationalist, and religious sexisms.

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  1. 1.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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