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New Zealand Police Cultural Liaison Officers: Their Role in Crime Prevention and Community Policing

  • Garth den Heyer
Chapter

Abstract

Ethnic Liaison Officers are a part of the Police Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services, which has staff in each police district, but is managed and coordinated from New Zealand Police National Headquarters. The role of this unit, the advice it gives, and the performance of its Liaison Officers has not been evaluated or examined. This article examines the role of Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services Liaison Officers, the reasons why these officers choose to enter this specialized area of policing and their understanding of their role. The article begins by describing criminal offending by Maori and then discusses the strategic response of the New Zealand Police to this major social issue. The main strategies used as a response by the police are examined, and the findings of a survey of Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Service officers, which was conducted in early 2016, are presented and discussed.

Keywords

New Zealand Police Maori Policing and minorities Community policing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garth den Heyer
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Criminology and Criminal JusticeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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