Advertisement

Disabled User Role on Mobile Accessible Application Development

  • Bruno RibeiroEmail author
  • Fernanda Pellegrini
  • Marcelo Anjos
  • Fabiana Florentin
  • Valeska Alves
  • Daniele Zandona
  • Tatiane Levrero
  • Walter Correia
  • Jonysberg Quintino
  • Jefté Macêdo
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 972)

Abstract

Most of the time, people without disabilities develop solutions for people with disabilities, and to understand the real needs of these users to create something valuable, the users have a fundamental role as active participants on the process of accessible application development. Some resources as researches, guidelines and usability tests that puts the user in the role to validate the flows, interactions, functionalities, navigation and even the testes are used to help the users to play his role. The accessibility guide created by SIDI establishes how to develop an accessible application, however, what really ensures that the software is accessible is the usability test performed by disabled users. This work will present the use case of Samsung’s application Relúmino that was created to improve the vision of partially impaired people. The result will demonstrate the importance of user participation in application development.

Keywords

Accessibility Samsung Relúmino User experience User role Visual impaired people 

References

  1. 1.
    Guide to development of Accessible Mobile Application. http://www.sidi.org.br/guiadeacessibilidade/en/index.html#inicio
  2. 2.
    World Health Organization, Disability and health. https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/disability-and-health
  3. 3.
    Torres, C., Oliveira, E., Liberal, R., Barros, V., Nascimento, C., Silva, F.Q.B., Santos, A.L.M., Correia, W., Penha, M., Macedo, J., Anjos, M., Florentin, F.: Mobile development with accessible approach: design in the mediation of inclusion, human factors in design. In: Interaction South America. Human Factors in Design, ISA 2017, Florianópolis, vol. 7, no. 13 (2018)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
    Melo, A.M., Baranauskas, M.C.C.: An inclusive option for cooperative assessment of user interfaces. In: Congress of the Brazilian Computer Society, Integrated Seminar on Hardware and Software, Campo Grande, MS, pp. 447–461 (2006)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Graupp, H., Gladstone, K., Rundle, C.: Accessibility, usability and cognitive considerations in evaluating systems with users who are blind. In: Stephanidis, C. (ed.) Universal Access in HCI: Inclusive Design in Information Society, vol. 4, pp. 1280–1284. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates (2003)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Nielman Norman Group – When to Use Which User-Experience Research Methods. https://www.nngroup.com/articles/which-ux-research-methods/
  10. 10.
    Dumas, J.S., Redish, J.C.: A Practical Guide to Usability Testing, Subsequent edn, Bristol (1993)Google Scholar
  11. 11.

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruno Ribeiro
    • 1
    Email author
  • Fernanda Pellegrini
    • 1
  • Marcelo Anjos
    • 1
  • Fabiana Florentin
    • 1
  • Valeska Alves
    • 1
  • Daniele Zandona
    • 1
  • Tatiane Levrero
    • 1
  • Walter Correia
    • 2
  • Jonysberg Quintino
    • 2
  • Jefté Macêdo
    • 2
  1. 1.Samsung Institute of Development for Informatics (SIDI)CampinasBrazil
  2. 2.CIn/Samsung ProjectUniversidade Federal de PernambucoRecifeBrazil

Personalised recommendations