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Neighborhood Risks

  • Edward P. St. John
  • Feven Girmay
Chapter
Part of the Neighborhoods, Communities, and Urban Marginality book series (NCUM)

Abstract

This chapter assesses the impact of risks on school completion associated with the neighborhoods where students lived. The analyses of the Detroit 2005–2009 student cohort found that neighborhood decline, especially increases in poverty and unemployment, undermined students’ opportunity to graduate. Analysis of school cases further reveals the marginalization of schools serving children living in high-poverty neighborhoods: Tech struggled to provide a viable learning environment for students facing neighborhood circumstance that put them at risk, Hope struggled to survive given declining public funding and had closed by 2016, and Kappa used corporate funding to build a curriculum that met state requirements, responded to local employment opportunities, and provided students options of college credit during high school.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. St. John
    • 1
  • Feven Girmay
    • 2
  1. 1.Saint HelenaUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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