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Educational Policy

  • Edward P. St. John
  • Feven Girmay
Chapter
Part of the Neighborhoods, Communities, and Urban Marginality book series (NCUM)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the ways state education policies and funding undermined educational opportunity in Michigan. In 2005, the State of Michigan raised science and math requirements for the graduating class of 2011, but it cut K-12 funding when schools were implementing higher cost science and math courses. The new curriculum had been recommended by the Governor’s Commission on Education, but the report overlooked the role of school funding. The state implemented higher requirements along with reductions in schools’ funding, adding to the high-risk contexts for the implementation of newly required graduation requirements in Detroit, where the population declined and charters were expanded.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. St. John
    • 1
  • Feven Girmay
    • 2
  1. 1.Saint HelenaUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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