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Introduction

  • Edward P. St. John
  • Feven Girmay
Chapter
Part of the Neighborhoods, Communities, and Urban Marginality book series (NCUM)

Abstract

Following the publication of A Nation At Risk in 1983, the federal government and most states used the rhetoric of education for global economic competition to nationalize education strategies and undermine links between schools and low-income neighborhoods in American cities. The economic globalization process benefited large corporations through internationalization of labor, and thereby hastened the loss of manufacturing jobs in Detroit and other cities. Unfortunately, the nationalization of curriculum—the process of raising math and science graduation requirements for all students by raising graduation requirements–further undermined schools serving low-income neighborhoods in Detroit that were already savaged by the loss of manufacturing jobs. With more highly concentrated poverty than most other US cities, Detroit’s schools, neighborhoods, and families were subjected to federal, state, and local reforms constructed with the intent of improving global economic competitiveness. In addition to framing this argument, chapter one describes the framework the authors used to assess how neighborhood risk factors, community resources, students’ prior achievement, and high school characteristics influence high school graduation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. St. John
    • 1
  • Feven Girmay
    • 2
  1. 1.Saint HelenaUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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